How 10 Top Writers Manage Their Mornings: Women Edition

3 weeks ago I wrote How 10 Top Writers Manage Their Mornings, in which I interviewed10 of the Top Authors on Medium about their morning. The goal was to create an article inspiring and motivating not only for people who read the piece, but also for me who put it together.

It was great motivator to wake up earlier, to work on the piece every morning and to learn about how the doers do it. I felt like I was making the most out of my mornings, and my morning routine gained a lot of momentum. There was clearly a before and an after.

I have kept releasing articles ever since, and since I enjoy learning from the best and I love writing interviews, I thought I’d release a Part 2 to the Morning Routine of Top Authors Series. In this sequel, I chose to interview only women, and to focus more on the direct relation between morning routine and personal success in life. You’ll notice the questions are slightly different.

I said it before and will say it again, there are no rules for success. Only consistency in the work you do. None of the people I interviewed are super-humans, and they all have 24 hours in their day, like you and I.

Here it is, enjoy.


Michele Koh Morollo

Michele Koh Morollo is a freelance journalist, copywriter, and the author of short fiction collection “Without: Stories of lack and longing”. She’s written for Dwell.com, AFAR, Psychologies, Business Traveller, Culture Trip, and CNN Travel, and has worked with brands such as Apple, Gibson, and Herman Miller. She lives in Hong Kong.

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

I’m usually up some time between 6:30am and 7:30am

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

I stretch, then do about 20 minutes of what I call “yogabata”. It’s a routine I came up with that combines yoga poses with the tabata method high-intensity interval training. After that I meditate for 10 minutes.

On days I have paid assignments and projects, I work from my home office. I’ll fix myself a breakfast of fruit, muesli and black coffee, and read two daily inspirational readings while eating. Then I shower and begin work.

On days when I work on my own stuff (short fiction and Medium articles) I shower after my morning exercise and meditation. I then walk to a nearby cafe and have a croissant and black coffee for breakfast. I’ll read the news on my phone while I eat, then begin work.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

I’d say about 70 percent. It’s important for me to set myself up right for the day. I suffer from allergies in the summer, and when I can’t breath well, I can’t think clearly because there’s not enough oxygen going to my brain. Exercise and deep breathing during meditation has helped with this. I see these two routines as natural stimulants that prep my body and mind for long periods of deep work.

My morning routine has evolved over time. In the past, my exercise and meditation sessions were longer. But I’ve found that shorter sessions work better because I then have more energy conserved for writing, and can begin work earlier.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

The desire to maintain peace of mind, and experience relief from psychological and emotional tension. When I was 17, I had a mental breakdown and clinical depression. The act of writing was what got me out of the doldrums, and I’m very grateful that I’ve been able to make a living, and a life from it.

I take comfort and pleasure looking at written words strung together to tell stories that help make sense of life. I hope that with my own writing, I can provide some of that comfort and pleasure to others too.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

For me, the biggest obstacle is the tyranny of multitasking. One problem I had when I started writing short stories was picking one idea and actually sticking with it rather than hopping from one to another the moment I felt stuck.

I work in blocks of 1.5 hours. I’ll set my alarm and when that time is up, I’ll allow myself to decide if I can and want to continue with the task at hand, or if I want to shift gears and work on something else. But for at least 1.5 hours I’ll give 100% to only one task.

Choose what you most need to or want to do at any given moment. Then, silence that nagging voice telling you about all the other items you have on your todo list. I think that’s the key to doing good work.


Jessica Wildfire

Jessica Wildfire is the editor of Splattered. A top writer in Humor, Relationships, Culture, Mental Healthy and many more subjects, she loves writing and teaching people how to write. To discover her work, check out her Medium profile.

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

I’m more of a night owl, so I’ll usually sleep as late as I can and save my relaxing, reflecting, and planning before I go to bed.

Mornings are more hectic these days. My spouse and I split childcare, so I’m either up at 5am or 6am, or I can sleep until 9am. Right now, I have one day a week where I can wake up whenever I want and work on whatever I want — as long as nobody’s sick, and none of my students or bosses are clambering for a meeting.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

Coffee. If it’s my day with the kid, then she comes first. I make her breakfast and we play for an hour or two. My spouse has a 9–5 job, and he prefers doing daycare drop offs because it saves gas and mileage. (I’m not going to argue with that.)

If I have to be somewhere like class or a meeting, I slap myself together and go. I’ll take a quick shower, have some oatmeal, sift through my email for anything urgent, and be heading out the door 30 to 40 minutes after waking up.

Sometimes I’ll wake up at 6am or 7am with an idea. If I can, I’ll take 2 hours to whip up a draft and either publish it then or do a final edit later.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

It’s important to have some kind of protected time every day, free from distractions. Most advocates of morning routines I’ve read make thatthe biggest point. Doing whatever you need to put yourself into a productive mindset, so you don’t spend your entire day simply reacting to everything that happens. Some people, like me, can do that at night and then jump into the next day with the same results.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

We’re all good at a handful of things, but we’re best at one thing. I found my own thing — writing — pretty early on. It gives me a sense of purpose. I’ve made a career out of that by building up related skills, like teaching and research.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

Let go of desired outcomes, and try to get lost in the moment of working on your project. When it’s done, try not to get too attached to what happens. So many content creators get worked up over stats, awards, and other superficial markers of success. Focusing too much on those kinds of things can hurt your creativity and lead to procrastination.


Tiffany Sun

Tiffany Sun is striving to rebuild her life by discovering who she is and learning what she is capable of after a 9-year heartbreak that left her stranded in China. You can read her stories at misstiffanysun.com

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

5am because this is when it is most quiet, which means I can work on the hardest task without getting distracted. If I sleep too late the night before, I try to wake up at 7am, which isn’t bad at all considering that I can still get in a good 1.5 hours of work before driving to the gym.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

Run for 20 minutes. I’ve read in The 5am Club by Robin Sharma that running is what primes your mind to double down on what’s most important in your day. Plus, it eliminates all of those nasty worries, concerns and thoughts you get right after waking up. All you think about are the more positive aspects of whatever you’re thinking of.

I don’t eat breakfast. I stopped two years ago because I do intermittent fasting. It helps my mind focus better on the task at hand because I don’t have to think about what I’m going to eat or when.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

My morning routine has always been the prime motivation for my personal success. I’m always tweaking it every now and then to see what works best based on schedule and mood.

So far, it’s been a year since I’ve started a morning routine and I’m very glad I did. I feel so much more accomplished and I have more time to do things I’ve been wanting to do. For instance, making my own chocolate bars, gardening, having dinner with my parents at least once a week…

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

My boyfriend, and the fact that I’m eager to learn and improve on all aspects of my life.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

Start on the smallest step that you’re able to do towards your goal. That’s it. The hardest part is really getting the momentum. Once you have that, things get a lot easier than you thought.


Anastasia Basil

Anastasia Basil is a columnist at Medium. Her work has led to interviews and mentions on the BBC, Telegraph, Buzzfeed, CBS Los Angeles, Upworthy, Popsugar, Bloomberg, CBC Vancouver Radio and others. Check out her website at anastasiabasil.com

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

My thoughts (and my dog) wake me between 5am and 5:30am. I like to have time alone before my kids get up. I drink a cup of coffee and think about meditating and stretching. I think about sipping hot water with lemon to rejuvenate my organs. Then I make another cup of coffee.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

Some people are into tattoos, or God, or bacon. I’m into words. I’m happy to be released in the morning so I can get back to writing. I recently saw some cute wall art at Target: All I need is sleep! and I heart naps! I looked but couldn’t find one that said: Sleep, those little slices of death — how I loathe them. Maybe Target ran out. I’ll look again next week.

I don’t eat breakfast. I make coffee and open my laptop. Sometimes I pick up where I left off with my work. Other times, I read Brain Pickings and go where it takes me. Maria Popova has created a beautiful site with much to explore.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

The stillness of early morning creates an illusion of time slowing down, which makes me think I have more of it (plus, no one is texting me at 5am). I’m a long-time reader of Stoic philosophy. Humans squander time , and this squandering is something the Stoics examine and seek to remedy.

My copy of Seneca’s On the Shortness of Life is worn and torn. If you read the first fifteen pages, you’ll start waking up early. I’m not sure if my morning routine makes a difference. I think reading books makes a difference. Given the choice to stay up and watch Netflix, or go to bed early and read, I read.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

Equal parts wonder and agitation. In Plato’s Theaetetus, Socrates says, “Philosophy begins in wonder.” When we expose ourselves to thoughts and experiences that do not mirror our own, we experience wonder.

Unfortunately, social media is an all-you-can-eat trough of sameness; our news feed is designed to please. And nothing pleases more than validation of who we are and what we think. I’m driven to wander from this trough and go looking — not for what to think, but how to think. The journey, as Alice says, grows curiouser and curiouser along the way.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

Once you’re agitated enough, you’ll begin. Agitation is a positive word. To be agitated is to be driven, it implies motion. I’ve seen it described as “a mental tossing to and fro”. We need to feed our brain ideas that agitate our own thoughts. I do this by reading the work of far greater minds than my own. I’m currently consuming everything by Yuval Noah Harari.

Distractions derail the best of us. I turn my phone on silent and leave it in a different room. There’s nothing more private and more promising than the empty space of a blank page.


Jennifer Chan

Jennifer is a writer and employment lawyer based in Toronto. On Medium, she writes about how the philosophy of minimalism can improve our work, careers, and personal finance. Follow her writing on Medium (@jennifertchan) and ramblings on Twitter.

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

I set my alarm for 5:45am but more often than not, I actually leave my bed around 6:15am. Though I don’t leave for work until 8:30am, when I start the day rushing around it’s generally a recipe for a crappy day. I move slowly in the morning, and I like to take my time.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

The first thing I do is check on my rabbit. I pet her good morning and feed her. My dog follows me to the kitchen where I start boiling water in the kettle and scoop coffee grounds in the French press. After I pour the hot water over the ground coffee, I feed my dog while the coffee steeps. I’ll then have a shower. At this point, my fiancée slowly wakes up and we’ll head to the kitchen for breakfast.

I used to practice intermittent fasting but I found I concentrated much better when I actually ate (shocker). Our easy go-to breakfasts are either oatmeal with almond milk, maple syrup, peanut butter and fruit, or peanut butter toast topped with bananas, and a smoothie. Starting our day together, playing with our dog and eating breakfast is pretty important to us. Especially since she’s a nurse who works 12-hour shifts and I, a lawyer, sometimes work late.

Afterwards, I’ll get ready for work, one of us will take out our dog, and then I head to the subway.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

My morning routine has evolved over the last years. Before we adopted rescue dogs, I would wake up at 5:45am, make coffee, sit down and write before heading to work. It was much more peaceful! But circumstances have changed. We adopted dogs, I switched to private practice, and my fiancee temporarily works out of town half the time. I’ve resigned to the fact that my morning is for family and less so for my writing.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

The health, happiness, and security of my little family. Even if that means working longer hours, sleeping less, and sticking to a strict budget. It’s all for the bigger goal of setting up our future to be as bright as possible.

On a personal level, I don’t believe in half-assing anything. My life motto is “it’s everything or nothing”. Right now, that means eliminating projects that I enjoyed (I previously had a podcast, personal finance blog, and a handful of freelance clients) and going all in on a few things . Mostly my legal career and high-quality articles on Medium. I want to seize the best opportunities and go 100% in on them.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

Declutter your calendar. Put your social life on pause (or at least slow it down). Stop checking social media. Leave your phone at home. It’s incredible how much time we have, and how much can be accomplished if we just focus.

The solution isn’t a morning routine but having one can certainly help. My morning routine grounds me and reminds me why I do what I do. In the shower, I silently count my blessings: my health, my family and their health, the opportunity to make a living wage through helping others. It’s all perspective.

Ultimately, I think routines are useful but it really starts with defining what you want and how bad you want it. At that point, whether you wake up 2 hours before going to work, or wake up and rush out the door ten minutes later doesn’t matter. Attitude informs actions, not the other way around.


Leah Fessler

Leah Fessler is a journalist, investor, and head of editorial at Chief. Read about why early morning is unintuitively the key to happiness.

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

I wake up between 5:45am and 6:20am every day, depending on how I’m feeling the night before. If I am crazy tired, I sleep in. It also depends on whether I’m trying to workout in the morning.

Part of my early wake up is due to my pug, Chester, who has a crazy accurate internal clock. Part of it is because I adore the early morning — when it’s quiet, cool, and none of the stress of the day has piled on.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

First, I try to spend a brief moment appreciating the quiet and calm of that just-woke-up moment. I tell my fiancé and Chester that I love them. It’s a good way to start the day, with some positivity and gratitude. Then, coffee.

I rarely cook a formal breakfast. I almost always eat some Fage greek yogurt with frozen berries and I’ll generally pick around the fridge at left overs too. I also shamelessly have a couple bites of ice cream most mornings . I know this isn’t healthy but it makes me happy and life is short. It generally takes me about 15 minutes to have coffee and wake up.

After that, I’ll usually put on some workout clothes, take Chester out for a walk, then go for a run. Running is the closest I’ve got to meditating, I try to do it as much as possible. If I don’t have time, I’ll hang with my fiancé for a bit to go over our upcoming days, then shower and head to work.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

A lot . But I wouldn’t attribute my success to the morning routine, just to waking up early. Everyone is different. If you’re not a morning person and you feel like you’re going to keel over and die before 8am, don’t try to hack your life and love mornings. Just thrive when you’re best.

Personally, I have adored the productivity of the early morning since I was a kid . The key has been realizing that I am beatbox before 10am, and capitalizing on that.

In college, I couldn’t work past 9pm but would write all my essays from 4am to 8am. At first, it terrified me to run the line so close to the due date. I probably should have planned in advance more, but once I realized I could trust my internal clock, things went pretty well.

As a professional and a pet parent, I just couldn’t make it work without the early wake up . I need to exercise to be good at my job during the day, and running at night is torture for me. My dog makes me happier than anything, but I couldn’t have fit him in if I didn’t wake up early to exercise him. The early mornings give me space and time to balance and relax, and it is impossible to overstate the value of those few hours.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

A bad case of perfectionism and the state of the world around me. So much is unequal, unjust, and flat-out bad. It’s my and every human’s responsibility to do our part to mitigate pain and amplify equality and opportunity.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

It’s kind of silly, but the Pomodoro timer really helps me. I am a terrible procrastinator, so it was key to learn to commit to working on something I hadn’t started for just 25 uninterrupted minutes at a time. If that’s too long, commit to five minutes. Tell yourself that you don’t need to finish it, or to do a good job. You just need to give it a few minutes of focus.


Kendra Kinnison

Kendra L. Kinnison, MBA, CPA, is the General Manager for Port Royal Ocean Resort and the author of Royal Resilience: Our Story of Surviving and Thriving After Hurricane Harvey. She’s also a leadership and productivity coach on Coach.me

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

Right now, I try to wake up naturally, usually between 5am and 6am. We’re still in the midst of disaster recovery from Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, which leads to the worst of kind of long-term stress. Sleep seems to be one of the best defenses against breaking down.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

I like to go for a walk at sunrise. That’s been about 6:30am, so I would often read until 6:15am or so. I get dressed, do a short meditation with the Breathe app on my watch, and head out for a walk. Some days, I’ll do a ride on my Peloton. I eat a quick breakfast around 7:30am.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

My routines change depending on the needs of the situation. I’d prefer higher intensity workouts, but that hasn’t worked for the last several months. Walking seems to be ideal for helping me to stay present in high stress situations. Taking the time to get settled in the morning is important so that I don’t project more stress onto my team.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

Completing our recovery from Hurricane Harvey and showing that teams can actually survive and thrive in tough situations. As a coach, I also enjoy seeing the breakthroughs and progress that my clients have. I’ve found that I get the most joy out of seeing other folks succeed and feeling like I played a small part in supporting them.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

I encourage everyone I work with to map out their schedule visually. It often reveals inherent conflicts or challenges, and displays our true priorities. A few adjustments usually make a big difference in creating space for key projects.

For many people, the early morning hours are ideal for focus time because there’s less distractions. But the real key is to be intentional in selecting and protecting their project time. Using a timer to work in Pomodoro cycles can be a helpful technique as well.


Linda Smith

Linda is a writer and content creator at burlap+blue. She’s fuelled by creativity, strong coffee and good books. You can find her on Medium here. She lives in Richmond, VA.

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

I’ve become more of a morning person as I get older. Currently, I wake up somewhere between 5:30am and 6:30am. This is partly because I have young kids, but mainly because I think getting an early start on the day is the best thing you can do for your productivity.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

I’ve found that a good cup of coffee is the very best way for me to start my day. I pair this coffee with some quiet reflection/mediation and maybe even some journaling.

I try to eat breakfast every morning, even though it’s more because I should than because I want to. I love Trader Joe’s Steel Cut Oatmeal, or even a bagel with some low-sugar apricot jam. My day never truly gets started, though, until I’ve had a shower and a good dose of exercise (either a long walk or barre class). I’ve found that if I start my day with intention and routine, the rest of the day runs more smoothly.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

I think a good morning routine can be life-giving and life-changing, though flexibility is important. There’s no one size fits all. If something isn’t working or life circumstances change, you absolutely can and should pivot to make your morning routine work for you.

The older my kids get, the more my routine evolves. I definitely look forward to the time when they have a bit more independence and my routine can include more meditation and journaling, even some writing/blog work.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

I feel very lucky to be able to work for myself, and having that quality of life and flexibility is a good motivator for me. I believe in the phrase “start as you mean to go”. For me, this means if I start my day off with intention and a solid routine, my day can’t help but follow.

Of course, I allow for flexibility as well. If my morning doesn’t go as planned I allow for that and move forward as best I can. My routine may need to change for a number of reasons, and I’m trying to be accepting and okay with that.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

Motivation can be a real problem for people, especially when they work for themselves and aren’t up against firm deadlines. I believe in scheduling time for those things most important to you. If I look at your calendar, I should have a clear idea of your priorities.

If it’s hard for you to stay on track, outside accountability may be your best bet. A mastermind group, friend or colleague you meet up with monthly can help you with your focus. Most importantly, though, be gracious with yourself. Remember that all entrepreneurs struggle on occasion. No one is as efficient as they’d like to be (or even as their social media feeds will lead you to believe).


Lydia Sohn

Lydia Sohn is a minister and writer. She’s the author of “What Do 90-Somethings Regret Most,” one of the top ten most read Medium essays of 2018. You can find her at revlydia.com

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

I used to wake up around 5am to get two solid hours to myself of reflection and writing before my kid woke up. It was miraculous. And then I got pregnant. Pregnant ladies need a lot more sleep. So these days, I wake up when my kid wakes up, around 7am. I’m looking forward to returning to my previous schedule, although it’s difficult to know when that will happen.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

I make breakfast for my kid and myself. My husband is usually still sleeping for another hour since he does our night shift of dinner clean-up and picking up our house. Breakfast usually includes some kind of toast, nuts, and fruit. Milk for the kid, coffee for me. We eat together and he jabbers the way 3-year-olds do and I nod and respond with as much enthusiasm as I can muster in the morning.

We then play a little bit together until my husband wakes up, at which point, he takes over and I prepare to go into the office. As soon as I get into my office, I shut the door so I can engage in an uninterrupted time of prayer, personal reflection, and professional writing. For most of my writing, I use the amazing Pomodoro technique that I’ve heard so many writers rave about.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

All of it! Getting centered in my office once I have time alone by praying or meditating. Writing down any thoughts that are cluttering my brain. Devoting blocks of time to writing. Those are the foundational habits for all of my productivity and success.

If I didn’t have those habits in place, I would very easily distract myself with emails, social media, coworkers, and random internet browsing.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

Several writers have shared this and I feel the same way. Getting started is always a big pain in the butt because it’s hard to change our inertia and rev up. But the fulfilment one feels after having written something that’s been lingering on one’s mind but had yet to express, or even just the fulfilment one feels after completing a time block of writing, is intensely satisfying.

Any kind of creative process — from writing, cooking or even just knitting a scarf — brings this kind of satisfaction and personal growth. The desire to keep imagining, creating what I imagine, and then sharing what I create with the world gives me so much happiness. This very process is what keeps me motivated from day to day.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

Well, I would first figure out the core root of the struggle. There may be a good reason as to why you are avoiding a project.

Perhaps that project is not something you’re invested or interested in. In that case, you would need to admit this to yourself and let it go. Or it may be that there’s a portion of that project you’re not interested in, in which you would need to tease that out to dissolve the resistance.

But if you are truly invested and passionate about a certain project and are just having difficulty getting started because it’s too overwhelming, then my advice would be to start with baby steps.

Ask yourself, “What’s the very next thing I have to do in service to my project?” Then, devote an uninterrupted 25 minutes to pursue that tiny step. The next day, ask yourself the very same question and pursue the next step. That’s how dreams come true . Through a million tiny steps that make up the entire journey towards our goals.


Keisha N. Blain

Keisha N. Blain is Associate Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh, Editor in Chief of The North Star, and President of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). She is the author of the award-winning book Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom.

#1 What time do you wake up in the morning?

I generally wake up sometime between 5:30am and 6am. I have always been an early-riser. I find that I do my best writing in the quiet hours of the morning while my family members are sleeping, and before I become consumed with a hundred distractions during the day.

#2 Once you’re up, what is the first thing you do in the morning?

I generally start the day with a cup of coffee. Once I start to brew a pot of coffee, I go through my list of writing tasks for the morning and line up a playlist on my iPad. Then I get to writing for a few hours to the sound of music (with headphones on). I eat breakfast after I meet my daily writing goals , generally by 10am.

#3 How much of your personal success (online and offline) do you attribute to your morning routine?

I started this writing routine a few years ago while in graduate school. It helped me finish my dissertation — and then my book — in a timely fashion. My daily writing routine has helped me to remain productive despite so many responsibilities and demands on my time. By writing daily (and early in the day), I’m able to juggle many things throughout the day while ensuring that I do not neglect my own writing projects.

#4 What drives you to do what you do on a daily basis?

I write with a goal of having a meaningful and positive impact on others. I believe that writing is a powerful medium that has the ability to change hearts and minds. I write with a sense of urgency to address the topics that concern me most and I write to tell the stories that are so often overlooked.

#5 What advice do you have for people who struggle to actually start working on the projects they have?

Add blocks of writing time to your daily schedule. Tell people you’re busy during those times and make every effort to write. Consider these blocks of time important appointments with yourself , invaluable time to advance your writing goals. Make it a daily habit to write and treat writing as a necessity.


Lessons learned

Here are the facts that stand out. Hopefully they can inspire you to build a better foundation for the beginning of your day:

  • 5 out of 10 authors exercise in the morning, either walking or running
  • 10 out of 10 authors wake up between 5am and 7am
  • 3 out of 10 authors recommend trying the Pomodoro technique
  • 10 out of 10 authors have a morning routine at least on the psychological level. They mentally prepare for their day, without necessarily having the same practical rituals every morning.

The best pieces of advice

Here is the breakdown of my favorite pieces of advice.

  • Michele Koh Morollo: For at least 1.5 hours, give 100% to only one task. Don’t multitask.
  • Jessica Wildfire: Let go of desired outcomes, and try to get lost in the moment of working on your project. Don’t focus too much on stats, awards, and other superficial markers of success.
  • Tiffany Sun: Start on the smallest step that you’re able to do towards your goal.
  • Anastasia Basil: Feed your brain ideas that agitate your own thoughts. Do this by reading the work of far greater minds than your own.
  • Jennifer Chan: . It’s all perspective. Define what you want and how bad you want it. Attitude informs actions, not the other way around.
  • Leah Fessler: Start with committing for five minutes. You don’t need to finish it, or to do a good job. Just give it a few minutes of focus.
  • Kendra Kinnison: Map out your schedule visually.
  • Linda Smith: Outside accountability. A mastermind group, a friend or colleague you meet up with monthly can help you with your focus.
  • Lydia Sohn: Dreams come true through a million tiny steps that make up the entire journey towards your goals.
  • Keisha N. Blain: Make it a daily habit to write and treat writing as a necessity.

Final words

I want to thank personally each and everyone of the authors who took part in this. Thank you not only for taking part in my project, but also for taking the time to write insightful answers to my questions. I am deeply grateful to: Michele Koh MorolloJessica WildfireTiffany SunAnastasia BasilJennifer Taylor ChanLeah FesslerKendra KinnisonLinda SmithLydia Sohn, and Keisha N. Blain.

This project has been just as much fun to put together as the previous one, and the final result is equally inspiring and full of ideas for anyone looking to implement or perfect a morning routine in their life.

I hope you enjoyed my article and feel more motivated about kick-starting your day tomorrow.

Structure your mornings, optimise your day, enjoy your life!

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